Detroit 67 Third Thursday Speaker Series: Through the Lens of Fiction

July 20th
6-8pm
Authors of historical fiction walk a delicate line: they must accurately represent the facts and forces of an era, but their overriding concerns are emotional truths and lived experience. In this program, author Susan Messer will discuss and read from her novel Grand River and Joy (University of Michigan Press, 2009). Named after the notable intersection in Detroit, the story explores the intersections between races, classes and neighborhoods that, among many other factors, drove the city to the boiling point in 1967.

This novel follows the Jewish wholesale shoe man Harry Levine from his business, located on Grand River near Joy Road, to his northwest-side home, where those who have the means debate whether to commit to their city or join the exodus to the suburbs. And those who don’t have the means—in this case, Curtis and Alvin, the black father and teenaged son who live upstairs from Harry’s business—feel the front-line consequences.

Join us on the third Thursday of each month beginning in February for a new speaker series. Local scholars and subject matter experts share their knowledge of Detroit’s history, with a focus on multicultural perspectives, civil rights, social justice and other related topics.
Categories: LectureFreeDetroit 67
Add to Calendar 07 20 2017 America/Detroit Detroit 67 Third Thursday Speaker Series: Through the Lens of Fiction Authors of historical fiction walk a delicate line: they must accurately represent the facts and forces of an era, but their overriding concerns are emotional truths and lived experience. In this program, author Susan Messer will discuss and read from her novel Grand River and Joy (University of Michigan Press, 2009). Named after the notable intersection in Detroit, the story explores the intersections between races, classes and neighborhoods that, among many other factors, drove the city to the boiling point in 1967.

This novel follows the Jewish wholesale shoe man Harry Levine from his business, located on Grand River near Joy Road, to his northwest-side home, where those who have the means debate whether to commit to their city or join the exodus to the suburbs. And those who don’t have the means—in this case, Curtis and Alvin, the black father and teenaged son who live upstairs from Harry’s business—feel the front-line consequences.

Join us on the third Thursday of each month beginning in February for a new speaker series. Local scholars and subject matter experts share their knowledge of Detroit’s history, with a focus on multicultural perspectives, civil rights, social justice and other related topics.
5401 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 48202 aBiAKdWFvzLJBiabzmaP28799 MM/DD/YYYY
Tickets:
Ticket Prices, Admission, Fees: FREE, registration encouraged.
Phone for tickets/more information: (313) 833-7912
Email for tickets/more information: [email protected]
Website for tickets/more information: Click here
Parking Cost and Availability:
Parking is $7 in the adjacent Museum lot on Kirby St. (between Woodward and Cass Avenues), as available. See website for other parking options.
Accessibility Information:
Most exhibits at the Detroit Historical Museum are handicap accessible and a manual wheelchair is available for visitor use. Please inquire at the front desk.
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